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The database is hosted by Kiel University
and is established by Magda Wieckowska-
Lüth, Wiebke Kirleis and Kay Schmütz,
Institute for Prehistoric and Protohistoric Archaeology.

© Wieckowska-Lüth/Kirleis/Schmütz 2020

Type: UG-1259

Category: Pteridophyta

Taxonomical identification: Pteridium aquilinum

First publication: Gelorini, V., Verbeken, A., van Geel, B., Cocqyt, C. and Vershuren, D. (2011) Modern non-pollen palynomorphs from East African lake sediments. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 164, 143–173

Other publication/s:
Burrows, J.E. and Johns, R.J. (2001) Ophioglossaceae. In: Beentje, H.J., Smith, S.A.L. (eds.), Flora of Tropical East Africa. A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam-Brookfield
Friis, I. and Vollesen, K. (1998) Flora of the Sudan–Uganda Border Area East of the Nile: I. Catalogue of vascular plants, 1st part. Det Kongelige Danske videnskabernes Selskabs Biologiske Skrifter 51, 1–389
Verdcourt, B. (2000) Dennstaedtiaceae. In: Beentje, H.J., Smith, S.A.L. (eds.), Flora of Tropical East Africa. A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam-Brookfield

Description: Spores tetrahedral-globose, usually with concave sides, yellow, 30–38 × 20–28 μm, surface diffusely and irregularly granulate, trilete scar with relatively short arms (2/3 the radius). In subfossil specimens the sculptured perispore is often missing.

(Sub-) Fossil occurence: No information

Co-occurence: No information

Modern occurence: Pteridium aquilinum has a worldwide distribution and occurs in a large variety of habitats (forest margins, grassland, woodland, rocky places and disturbed areas) in lowland to high mountain regions (Friis and Vollesen, 1998; Verdcourt, 2000). It is definitely the most common African fern, often forming vast stands in eastern parts of southern Africa, and frequently becoming an invasive weed following land-clearance and fire (Burrows, 1990).

Palaeoenvironmental indication: No information